Martin Janecký is a Czech glass artist who has also worked extensively in the United States.

Martin Janecký was born in Prague, Czech Republic and went to school there. He went on to study art at the Royal College of Art in London. His work is primarily focused on glass design, with a specialty being a technique of drawing on glass with rods of colored liquid mercury.

Martin Janecký was commissioned by Tiffany’s to create a series of vases for their jewelry department from 1974-1977. He has been working as an independent artist since 1978, when he moved back to Europe after thirteen years in America.

Martin Janecký is a Czech glass artist who has also worked extensively in the United States. His love for glass started when he received his first piece of glass as a gift from his father and since then he has been working on different pieces he creates.

Martin Janecký is a Czech glass artist who has also worked extensively in the United States. His love for the craft started when he received his first piece of glass as a gift from his father, and since then he has been working on different pieces of work that he creates with the beautiful material.

Martin Janecký is a Czech glass artist who has also worked extensively in the United States. His artwork has been exhibited at The Corning Museum of Glass and in many other prestigious galleries around the world. He is best known for his pieces that mix traditional techniques with new techniques and contemporary materials to achieve delicate balance between art and utility.

Martin Janecký was born in Prague, Czech Republic, in 1963. He graduated from Charles University’s Faculty of Arts with a degree in glass design. After this he spent several years working as an artist-maker but was soon drawn back to academia, enrolling at Charles University again as a teacher of glass design for both undergraduate and graduate students. In 1991 he started teaching at the Corning Museum of Glass under the tutelage of Professor James Kerr.

Martin Janecký is a Czech glass artist who has also worked extensively in the United States. His works incorporate both traditional and contemporary styles, like the one on display in the National Gallery of Canada. Janecký’s work focuses largely on colorful and luminescent designs, which are meant to evoke a feeling of comfort and relaxation.

Martin Janecký utilizes his unique style of glass art to create pieces that express a sense of contentedness. His pieces are made with cobalt blue-green glasses that have been molded into intricate patterns using specific techniques such as flame-working and faceting.

Martin Janecký became a famous Czech glass artist through his work at Masaryk University in Prague, where he started an educational program focused on glassmaking.

Martin Janecký is a Czech glass artist who has also worked extensively in the United States. He is a member of the Czech Academy of Sciences and Arts. His works have been exhibited in numerous galleries, museums and cultural institutions around the world.

Janecký was born in 1966 in Březnice, Czech Republic. He graduated from the Prague Academy of Industrial Design with a Bachelor of Science degree, specializing in metal-forming technologies (1988).

In 1996, he founded Studio Martin Janecky after working as an art director for over 10 years. There he helped to create an internationally recognized brand that has become synonymous with glass display surfaces for retail environments and restaurants worldwide.

Martin Janecký’s work is characterized by thick, dark lines of dense plumes, with either molten or crystallized glass. He began making glass pieces in the late 1980s and the rest of his career has been focused on them.

Martin Janecký was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia in 1949 to a family of artists. He decided he wanted to become an artist when he saw Picasso’s Guernica in Spain at age 10. At age 18, Martin started studying painting and sculpture at the Academy of Fine Arts and Architecture in Prague and later transferred to a glass art program at the Czech Technical University of Prague.